Asperger’s or Introversion?

When I first came to understand I have Asperger’s Syndrome, I had many people tell me that I am merely introverted Well, I am certainly introverted. But let us consider the Asperger’s Fact Sheet and the criteria. Do I meet them?

  • Do I have an “all-consuming interest and a one-sided, self-focused social approach”?

As a child I was obsessively interested in dinosaurs, then sharks, then orchids.  I would make lists of dinosaurs or sharks or orchids; sometimes those “lists” would be drawing after drawing after drawing — in a list-like fashion. They would be labeled with data about the dinosaur or shark or orchid. Length or location or some sort of objective fact.

I am still obsessively focused, but the focus has become self-organizing network processes. I can sit and talk about that for hours and hours. And I promise you that the conversation will be quite one-sided and self-focused. Most of my conversations have been and continue to be. As a result, I work well with others on projects in which I am interested, but I don’t socialize well.

  • Is it true that because I “cannot read social or emotional cues well, they come off as insensitive, pushy or strange, yet have very little insight into how they are perceived”?

I cannot tell you how many times I have been accused of being arrogant. Even when I am insisting we need to have humility in our ignorance. I have been told I am “insensitive” when I try to solve problems. I’ve been told more than once I seem “strange.” And my wife constantly reassures me that I have very little insight as to how I am perceived by others and that I cannot read social or emotional cues well.

  • Do I engage in “taking turns speaking, staying on a topic for a polite number of turns, and showing interest in someone else’s comments. People living with Asperger’s tend to talk at people instead of with them, and will often talk about their favorite topics long after the other person has become tired of the subject.”

I can definitely dominate a conversation. I have a tendency to interrupt when I have a thought. I stay on topics for a long, long time (or, if I’m not interested, not very long at all), and I have a hard time feigning interest. I do tend to talk at people instead of with them — I use language to communicate information rather than to create relationships — and I most definitely talk abut my favorite topics long after the other person has become tired of the subject. I am sure I am tiring even at conferences.

  • “Having a normal or higher IQ allows a person to learn and know, to push the envelope in intellectual ability, and to rejoice in the pursuit of some realm of knowledge, but there can also be negative effects. When someone is aware he is different, when, for all his intelligence, he cannot successfully make a friend, or get a date, or keep a job, he may end up far more prone to depression and despair than a person with a lower IQ. It has been found that children with both high-functioning autism and Asperger’s suffer from depression and anxiety more than their typical peers.”

I have always had a hard time making friends. I typically just “befriend” the friends of friends. I got by with my brother’s friends for a long time. I made exactly one friend during my Master’s in English, and I lost track of him immediately after we graduated. That was two years in Mississippi. I made one friend during my Ph.D., and was mostly friends with his friends. I got my first girlfriend when I was 25. I was, in fact, quite depressed for most of the 1990s because of these kinds of relationship problems. And I continue to have problems keeping a job.

  • Meltdowns.

I used to have meltdowns. When I was interrupted at a task, especially. When things just became too much. I have had two nervous breakdowns. But I have, over the years, learned how to deal with the stressors in my life. Yet, I do have to fight off blowing up when I am interrupted at my obsession/work.

  • Clumsiness.

I walked on my tiptoes as a child — something quite common in people with Asperger’s/autism. I was a disaster at trying to play any kind of sports. Teachers complained about my handwriting skills.
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There are other aspects to Asperger’s, which includes thinking style. Bottom-up thinking, analytical thinking, being able to see patterns extremely well, strongly visual thinking — are all typical of those with Asperger’s and autism. I am equally very bad at top-down and strategic thinking typical of neurotypicals. Strategic thinking is extremely exhausting, and I’m not very good at it.

I suppose it is entirely possible to have every trait of Asperger’s and not have it, to only be introverted. But you should probably bet on Asperger’s being the most likely diagnosis. And my own positive diagnosis certainly confirmed that bet, at least for me.

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