The Mesolimbic Reward Pathway

The mesolimbic reward pathway is a neural system that helps people be more social. The larger it is, the most social a person is. Perhaps not surprisingly, it’s smaller in people with autism.

What this pathway seems to do is make social interactions pleasurable. Again, the larger it is, the more pleasurable one’s social interactions are going to be. That is, you get rewarded for being social. While it’s likely social interactions aren’t actually made painful by having a smaller pathway, social interactions simply aren’t as pleasurable. If you’re not being rewarded for something, how likely are you to do it?

The authors point out that they haven’t untangled cause and effect quite yet on this. Do more social interactions cause the mesolimbic reward pathway to increase, or does its size increase social interactions?

This makes me wonder, though, why it is that many of us on the spectrum find pleasure in certain things–more so, it seems, than do others? For example, my clipboard gives me pleasure. I use it to do most of my writing. My books give me pleasure. I’m very happy just looking at them in my library. Is there a pathway in the brain for object-pleasure? Or does the mesolimbic reward pathway make social interactions so much more pleasurable that neuroptyicals prefer social interactions over the pleasure things give them?

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